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Julie Carr
Julie Carr is the author of four books of poetry, most recently 100 Notes on Violence, which won the Sawtooth Award, and Sarah-of Fragments and Lines, a National Poetry Series pick, out from Coffee House this fall. She is also the co- publisher of Counterapath Press and teaches at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her critical monograph, Surface Tension: Ruptural Time and the Poetics of Desire in Late Victorian Poetry, is forthcoming.

Of the seven deadly sins I am perhaps most guilty of wrath. This probably one of the reasons I wrote a book about violence. I am guilty of expressing that wrath by throwing objects (as I mention in my book)órecently, a raw egg, which makes a surprisingly far reaching mess. Wrath is something I have inherited, but that does not make it any less mine. Yoga practice might be helping. But what seems to help the most is the blessings of age and forgiveness (which comes with age).

Andrew Evans
Andrew Evans is a writer who lives in Washington, DC. He is male, in his mid-thirties, and wears glasses. Andrew has written four books, including his big, fat guidebook to Iceland which won second place (not first) for the Lowell Thomas Award. He is a contributing editor for National Geographic Traveler and the resident digital nomad for NationalGeographic.com. He spends much of his time in foreign climes, where he sends travel-related tweets under the handle @WheresAndrew. He has not died yet, though he's often come quite close.

When I was eleven years old, somebody stole my pants. I was at swimming class at the YMCA and when I opened my locker, my jeans were missing. I searched all around the puddle-filled boys locker room without success. In the end, I was forced to walk to my mother's car with a wet beach towel wrapped 'round my middle, in tennis shoes, in the snow. She drove me home and I sobbed for three hours straight.

Andrew Farago
Andrew Farago is the curator of the Cartoon Art Museum in San Francisco. He has curated exhibitions for venues throughout the United States, Japan, Greece, and Canada. He has written for Marvel Comics, The Comics Journal, and Animation World Network, and is the author of The Looney Tunes Treasury for Running Press. He lives in Berkeley, CA with his wife, cartoonist and author Shaenon K. Garrity.

What comes to mind right now is the fact that [my editor] Nevin approached me about writing something for Fawlt about six months ago, reminded me about it a month ago, and Iím typing this about 20 minutes before the last possible moment I can send it to him without derailing the first issue. All this after I made a special point of mentioning the importance of deadlines in my self-serving essay. On the other hand, at least Iím not drunk. I guess that would be worse, wouldnít it? And itís not like Iíve ever killed anybody. Thatís not so bad, is it?

Nadja Hallström
Nadja Hallström is a photographer from Sweden. She does work for magazines and theater. She lives in both Stockholm and New York.

Olena Jennings
Olena Jennings completed her MFA at Columbia University and her MA at the University of Alberta. Her translations from the Ukrainian have been published in Poetry International, Poetry International Web, Chelsea, and The Wolf. Her feature articles and book reviews can be found on KGB Bar Lit, Fanzine, and The Millions. Her fiction can be found on Joyland and KGB Bar Lit.

When I was young I coveted the toys of my friends. I was especially obsessed with miniatures, toys that could fit easily inside my palm. I resisted the temptation to take for a long time. From the preschool room, I took a miniature plastic green teddy bear, which I later lost, and from my best friend's house I took a tiny doll's hanger, which I returned to her, filled with guilt. This was the last of my kleptomania.

Michelle Lawrence
Michelle Lawrence is earning her Master’s degree in fiction at Miami University, where she also teaches writing. Her fiction has been featured in Identity Theory, honored by the Glass Woman prize, and is forthcoming in Blue Five Notebook. She lives in Dayton, Ohio.

There are days when I believe I have every fault under the sun; I'm obsessive, I'm nosy, I'm picky and judgmental. I'm a martyr and no one will ever see my value. Other days, I have no faults; I'm the best, and anyone who thinks otherwise is surely stupid. It takes a pretty neat person to sit next to me on that roller coaster, but if they do, I'll sit next to them on theirs, and try to enjoy the wind in our eyes and the way our stomachs bump around.

Nevin Martell
Nevin Martell is a food writer, pop culture archeologist, and travel junkie. He is the author of the small press smash Looking for Calvin and Hobbes: The Unconventional Story of Bill Watterson and His Revolutionary Comic Strip (Continuum, 2009), Standing Small: A Celebration of 30 Years of the LEGO Minifigure (DK, 2009), Dave Matthews Band: Music for the People (Pocket, 2004), and Beck: The Art of Mutation (Pocket, 2001). He is a Contributing Editor at Filter magazine and his work has appeared in Paste, Giant, Menís Health, Washington City Paper, Washington Post Express, High Times, and Flaunt, as well as online at RollingStone.com and Guardian.co.uk. Currently, he lives with his wife in Washington, DC, where he writes full time. You can find him online at www.nevinmartell.com.

At a recent party I found myself talking to a group of strangers who seemed to immediately take to my sense of humor. They just couldn't stop laughing, no matter what I said. During the course of my first drink, as they chuckled at my every word, all I could think to myself was,Damn, I'm on fire tonight. However, as I walked to the bar for a refill during a break in the conversation, I realized that what had inspired my new acquaintances' good humor was the fact that my fly was wide open and my boxers emblazoned with a cartoon red squid were totally visible.

Scott McClanahan
Scott McClanahan is the author of Stories and Stories II (published by Six Gallery Press). His other works include Hillbilly, Stories 5!, The Nightmares and Crapalachia (all forthcoming) www.hollerpresents.com.

Douglas Piccinnini
Douglas Piccinnini is the author of the chapbooks SOFT (The Cultural Society) and CRYSTAL HARD-ON (minutes Books). His work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Antioch Review, EOAGH, Jacket, Lana Turner, The Portable Boog Reader 5, Sustainable Aircraft and Vlak—among others. Piccinnini has been awarded residencies by Art Farm in Marquette, NE, The Elizabeth Bishop Society of Nova Scotia and The Vermont Studio Center. He lives in Brooklyn, NY and curates the CROWD Reading Series.

Memory is something. Something historical. Something fictional. Something fictional. I was \ you was \ was \ wish you were there.

Candace Savage
Candace Savage lives and writes near the South Saskatchewan River in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. An new, updated edition of her guide to grassland ecology, Prairie: a Natural History, will be published next spring. You will find her communing with penguins at www.candacesavage.ca.

The first time I went out for dinner with my dearly beloved, I dressed up in my best vintage velvet dress and a pair of shoes with what might have been called princess heels. Before the evening was over, I tripped on my way to the bathroom and broke one of my heels off, exposing me as the commoner that I really was.

Brian Trimboli
Brian Trimboli is about to receive his MFA from NYU, where he was awarded a fellowship to assist with their Veteran Writers Workshop. He lives on Long Island and is teaching Creative Writing till the end of Spring. He has poems published or forthcoming in Gulf Coast, Indiana Review, RATTLE, and Forklift, Ohio.

As far as faults go, I might be perfect. Besides that, I have trouble sleeping, and anxiety when confronted with conversation. Too many times Iíve declined company out of fear of nothing to say, or that they might stay too long or too little. I miss my friends appropriately, and am afraid of how theyíll react if they find out I believe that. Iím sorry, I make things completely too personal. If I could change one thing, Iíd like to be able to throw a football.

Elizabeth Clark Wessel
Elizabeth Clark Wessel studies poetry and translation at Columbia University. Her prose has appeared in Livraison, Bang, Poetry International and on The New Yorker's Book Bench blog. She is an editor at Argos Books.

I have too many shoes. I have so many shoes that it's embarrassing. Many of them are physically unbearable to wear, and I still can't part with them. I have many other faults, but none that I enjoy as much as my weakness for vintage shoes.